StingRay Surveillance

The New York Times is reporting today that police departments across the country are using a new surveillance device called StingRay to track and locate criminals, terrorists, or missing persons.

However, StingRay raises serious privacy concerns. StingRay works by simulating a cell-phone tower and redirecting cell-phone traffic from the cell-phone tower to the StingRay device. Once this cellphone traffic is captured by the StingRay Device, police are able to obtain not only the location of the targeted cellphone, but also innocent third-party cellphone traffic that was captured by StingRay. The cellphone traffic that is captured includes text messages, emails, and other voice data information.

StingRay is manufactured by the Harris Corporation. Harris Corporation

STINGRAY DEVICE.
STINGRAY DEVICE.

requires any law enforcement agency who purchases StingRay to sign a non-disclosure agreement that prevents them from discussing StingRay. [Note: If you search Harris Corporation’s website, there is no mention of StingRay.]  StingRay also goes by the name of KingFish and cell-site simulator.

In short, this story highlights how police are using technology to prosecute individuals in ways that are both breathtaking and alarming.

GENARO R. CORTEZ
PHONE: 210.733.7575
730 W. HILDEBRAND AVENUE, SUITE 2
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 78212